Ten Tips On Delegating Work

One way to manage your time more effectively is to delegate work to others on your staff or to contract workers you hire for specific projects. How often I hear such comments as, “It takes too much time to delegate.” “If I delegate the work there is no guarantee that the work will be done properly. It is just easier to do it myself.” “No one can do this as well as I can.” If others who have a lower hourly rate can do the work while you focus on the work only you can do, your cash flow will be better because you can do more of the work that only you can do.

1. Be specific about what you want done. Be clear as to the purpose of the delegated work and what kind of results you expect. Take the time to answer the person’s questions. This takes less time than redoing work.

2. Set a realistic deadline for the delegated work and make sure that this is workable for the person to whom you are delegating the work.

3. Give the person the information he/she will need and point them toward other resources he/she may use to complete the work

4. Be available for questions and require periodic progress reports.

5. If you are delegating because you have so much to do that you do not have time to give explicit instructions, be sure to delegate to a member of your team or a contract worker who can do the work with a minimum of direction. Perhaps they have done this job before or they have had experience with similar projects.

6. Once you delegate to someone who is well equipped to handle the task, allow the person space to be imaginative in his/her approach and to take the initiative to do something differently or do it in a bigger way (as long as you get the results you are looking for!).

7. If you want to use the delegation of the task (problem) as a way to develop a member of your staff or a contract worker, leave time in your schedule to provide enough detail as to how to go about getting the task done as is necessary for that particular person. (Developing a team member means eventually you will not have to give as much direction.)

8. Have a system to report back to you so that you get feedback without being constantly interrupted during your day. Have a list of critical dates so that you get the feedback regularly.

9. Keep a log of all the projects you delegate and their status. Update the log as you get feedback.

10. Give credit and praise for the successful completion of the task or solution of the problem.

Top 10 Reasons Why Most Corporate Health Programs Do Not Work

  1. They are “programs”. Right away this implies a finite, set time, usually based on a predetermined agenda. Let’s help our employees on a process to evolve into healthier steps and give them the tools to continue this process.
  2. Don’t help the participants set the right goals – often unrealistic, superficial, or non health centric goals are set which lead to non compliance or learned helplessness. Many people reach for superficial goals normally associated with a fitness program which are temporary at best. By guiding them to dig a few levels deeper, addressing their own unique set of needs and any pre existing demands in their lives – a sustainable growth oriented process is developed and embraced. And yes, those original more superficial goals will be achieved in a more livable lifestyle.
  3. The Program is based on “pop fitness” vs. cellular fitness which is the only way to address health issues. If the Pop fitness paradigm doesn’t fit – which it usually doesn’t – leads to frustration and a sense of failure. The other aspect that very few consider – the “pop fitness” paradigm can be dangerous for many. Instead of fitness from the outside and assuming its helping on the inside (big assumption) fitness needs to be addressed from the inside out.
  4. Programs are one size fits all – not addressing needs, time, medical issues – possibly creating greater biological mayhem. Needs assessments do not have to be that complicated – and they set the stage for compliance and employee confidence. We all like to feel someone cares about us – not just filling in forms checking off boxes.
  5. Programs present a list of “shoulds” and “should nots” – Nobody is looking to feel deprived, guilted or more on their to do list. None of us are looking for another miserable thing to do in our lives.
  6. Missing Measurable Outcomes: The process helps participants recognize progress & work through setbacks providing mathematically measured success at regular intervals. Nothing assures adherence more than progress and victory.
  7. The Providers: most “fitness professionals” are limited to the limited outer appearances side of fitness mentioned earlier. The same information can be obtained searching online. That same information we shake our heads and say “tried it”. An understanding of hormones, circadian rhythms, agents in their environment that can be sabotaging their efforts beyond junk food in the cupboard and no time for exercise… if these many deeper aspects of cellular health are not incorporated – the program is far too simplistic, misleading and incomplete.
  8. Accountability: We all have greater appreciation when we have invested time and effort into the project. Employees can see a direct, quantitative relationship between individual changes and outcomes
  9. Follow through – Evolution did not happen in 1 session new habits. Psychologists say it takes 2 months of consistency to integrate a new lifestyle habit. Progression into habits often takes 2-3 cycles of testing, growth and evolution. We all know about going to a seminar – getting all Ra Ra – and then… flatline.
  10. Fitness Baggage… Attitude is everything. We all have experiences we are less proud of – and unfortunately that baggage weighs us down and doesn’t allow us to move forward. The go forward is far too often nothing more than either a pep talk or lost in the fine print.

What an incredible way to build corporate camaraderie and show employees how management cares for the person – not just the worker.

Nurture a person’s heartbeat – Nurture the Corporate heartbeat!